The Norwegian Summer Institute on Language and Mind 2018

Details coming later in 2017. Watch this space.

See below for details of the summer institute which took place in August 2017.

Thank you to all participants

Dear friends and colleagues,
We’d like to thank you all very much again for having taken time in your busy schedules to come to Oslo and for making the summer institute such a success. We very much appreciate the thought and effort that you put in and the wonderful collaborative atmosphere that you helped us to develop.

The Norwegian Summer Institute on Language and Mind

summer institute homepage | lecture programme | location | accommodation | food and drink | sights

Public transport in Oslo

The underground (T-bane), trams, buses and local ferries are all run by Ruter. Travelcards allow travel on all of these except the Bygdøy ferry, which requires a separate ticket.

For almost all purposes the best thing is to get a travelcard and put a 7-day or 24-hour, zone 1 pass onto it. The validity period runs from the first time you use it: you have to 'touch in' that first time, but not subsequently.

Travelcards can be bought at some metro (T-bane) stations and (more helpfully) at all Narvesen and 7 Eleven convenience stores.

If travelling less frequently, still get a travel card, but use pay-as-you-go credit. In that case, you have to touch in at the beginning of each journey, and can then travel on any combination of trams, T-bane, busses, and ferries for one hour.

There's also a mobile app 'RuterBillett' which you can download and use. That allows you to use your iPhone (or similar) as your ticket, using a credit card to buy one-off fares or period passes.
Note: you need a live network connection to buy a new ticket; once the ticket starts, the app works fine without a connection. So even if you don't have phone data in Norway, this can work if you use university or hotel wifi to buy the ticket and set its start time before you travel.

Things to see in Oslo

In rough order of interest. For more, see Visit Norway's Oslo page

Slottsparken: the palace gardens – a pleasant park in the town centre, surrounding the 'slott' (royal palace). During the daytime, it's possible to go into the Queen's garden, a slightly more formal garden. (It's on the south side of the palace).

Viking Ship Museum, on Bygdøy peninsula, near to the Folk Museum. Get there by ferry from the harbour in front of the city hall ('Rådhuset'). (N.B. Ruter travelcards are NOT valid on this ferry.) There are two stops on Bygdøy: the nearer one is 'Dronningen'.
Ruter bus 30 goes there from the city centre too.

Folk Museum, on Bygdøy peninsula, near to the Viking Ship Museum. Get there by ferry from the harbour in front of the city hall ('Rådhuset'). (N.B. Ruter travelcards are NOT valid on this ferry.) There are two stops on Bygdøy: the nearer one is 'Dronningen'.
Ruter bus 30 goes there from the city centre too.

Aker River/waterfall & park

Opera House. Opened in 2008. Interesting building. You can walk on the roof, which has a nice view of Oslo bay

The national museum – actually several museums on separate sites. Opening hours. Free entry on Thursdays! The sub-museums include:

Botanical Garden. On the same site as the garden, there is a zoological museum.

Munch Museum, in Tøyen. Not far from the T-bane station, but poorly signposted. You may need to ask a local for directions when you get there.

Excursions

Oslo Fjord – ferries (free with Ruter pass, except the Bygdøy ferry, which requires a separate ticket.). Well worth the ride, especially the one to Bygdøy peninsula. (See the entries for the Viking Ship Museum and Folk Museum above.)
The ferries go from the harbour, right in front of the city hall ('Rådhuset'). Route map

Norway in a Nutshell: This is an expensive (ca. 2,400 NOK/€260/$300) /1-2 day excursion on trains, boats and busses via a high plateau to an arm of the nearest bit of dramatic high-sided (i.e. proper) fjord, Sognefjord. (In Norwegian 'fjord' just means sea-loch, and even Oslo has one of those, but it's not spectacular, although it's very nice.)

Swimming

Bislet Bad. Pricey (200 Kr for a swim) and the pool is not very big, but centrally located and very pleasant.
(Pilestredet 60)